Category Archives: Ceramic Arts & Crafts

Crafts at home

Crafts at home

The molds are much better, the designs are more creative, products are getting better and we have more variety. Creative emphasis is stronger. Glazes, underglazes and overglazes are coming back into focus and the new unleaded glazes. The ceramist person needs to be encouraged to learn how to use them correctly and to capitalize on the many techniques available. We, as shop owners, need to constantly promote change. There is something for everyone.
To keep on doing what we have been doing: to be a better person tomorrow, greet each day with joy and greet each customer with a smile.

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Crafting

Crafting

My youngest daughter has inspired me daily. Having marvelous teachers throughout the years has added to my knowledge. My students range from 30 to 80+ years of age. The majority are retired seniors. Their abilities range from beginner to advanced. We encourage creativity and some students hand-build their own pieces with clay. I feel ihis is a good learning experience and furthers ceramic knowledge based on the individual’s capabilities. Also 1 don’t believe competition and awards are the most important aspect of the ceramics industry. Treating my customers as I would want to be treated, promoting the industry as an art form and instilling creative pride in my students.

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Crafts teacher

Crafts teacher

Who is a celebrity? We think they are people just like you, involved, interested and interesting. In Celebrity Clips, we introduce teacher, artist and shop owners in the hobby ceramics industry who are making a difference in their own way.
Located in Youngtown, Arizona, the first retirement community in the country, is a ceramic shop, owned and operated by a person with so much enthusiasm about ceramics and life in general, it makes you want to be a part of all the fun. Even though her successful business has tripled in size, it does not stop her from being a great teacher or a friend to all ot her students.
My first involvement was during my daughter’s high school years, only doing a few classes through the years due to family obligations. I again resumed classes in 1988 after my retirement and a move to Arizona. In 1991 1 started my own business. I am Duncan Certified and Hanovia Certified. I have been a member of IADCCT, (International Association of Duncan Certified Ceramic Teachers), for over 5 years and attend most of their educational functions. My specialty is filling the needs of people; whether it be in helping, listening or advising, I will always be there for them.

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CHRISTMAS IS COMING

CHRISTMAS IS COMING

Porcelain is a demanding medium. It takes a tough kiln to fire beautiful dolls. A kiln that can fire porcelain can easily fire ceramics.
Doll makers expect a lot from their kilns, because they put so much of themselves into a doll.
Donna RuBert, doll sculptress, has made all her dolls in Paragon kilns. She and other doll makers depend on the even heat distribution of Paragon kilns. Porcelain’s narrow temperature range demands it.

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Glass Butterfly

Glass Butterfly

SMALL BUTTERFLY
Compleie this butterfly as for the large one, using thinned colors as follows: Brite White on body around butterfly wings and on large spots inside upper wings (see the photo). Fill in the body with Darkest Brown. Use Rosewood shaded with Eggplant for the background areas on the upper and lower wings. For the remaining areas, use Peacock toward the center of the body and shade with Sapphire.
Allow the butterfly to dry.
Step 6 Place each butterfly on a sagger coated with glass separator, making sure each one is centered. Fire the butterflies to cone 016. With the lid propped, fire thirty minutes on low and thirty minutes on medium; close the lid and fire on high to completion. Do not open the kiln until it is completely cold.
Step 7 Paint the antenna of each butterfly with Raven Black nonfiring acrylic stain, then glue a rhinestone to the tip of each one.
Step 8 Turn the small butterfly over and apply 1 coat of gold leaf sizing to the entire back of the piece. Allow the piece to dry until the sizing loses the milky look but is still sticky. Apply Silver leaf over the sizing. Allow the butterfly to dry then use a cotton ball or a soft tissue to remove the excess Silver leaf. Use a soft brush to apply a coat of gloss sealer to the dry leaf.
What You’ll Need:
■ Large butterfly sagger.
■ 4 5″ by 5″ squares of single strength glass.
■ 4 4″ by 4″ squares of single strength glass.
■ Denatured alcohol.
■ Paper towels.
■ Glass cutter.
■ Abrasive stone.
■ Cleaning tool.
■ Applicator bottle with fine metal line tip.
■ Palette.
■ Palette knife.
■ Various brushes.
■ Fine tip marker.
■ Glass colors-Clear, Brite White, Outline Black Gloss Black Orange, Sun Yellow, Darkest Brown, Sap phire, Eggplant, Rosewood, and Peacock
■ 2—5″ pieces of high fire wire.
■ Glass separator.
■ Multipurpose glue.
■ Rawm Black nonfiring acrylic stain
■ Rhinestones.
■ Gold leaf sizing
■ Silver leaf.

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Fruit Wreath crafts

Fruit Wreath crafts

During Colonial limes, fruit-covered wreaths were often hung on doors to greet guests I as signs of welcome and hospitality. Here is a lovely ceramic wreath covered with a wealth of luscious fruit to adorn your home.
Step 1 Clean the greenware in the usual manner, then fire the piece to cone 04 (1940°F-1060°C).
Step 2 Apply 2 smooth coats of While nonfir-ing opaque stain to the entire piece, allowing each coat to dry thoroughly. Check lor any missed areas by brushing the wreath with antiquing solution; if discolorations appear, dry with T-shirt material or paper towels and reapply the White stain.
Step 3 Tip a bristle brush in blending medium, then pick up some Brown nonfiring translucent stain. Apply this color to a small area, working it into the crevices. While the color is still wet, remove it by wiping the area with T-shirt material. Continue in this way to antique the entire wreath.
Moisten the cloth with antiquing solution and lighten the entire piece, especially the banana, lemon, and peaches.
Step 4 Paint the various fruits with translucent stain as follows: Place a few drops of blending medium and each of the stains in separate spots on a glazed tile or other palette. Lightly tip the brush with medium then into color and swirl the brush on the palette to distribute the color. Brush the color onto the indicated areas, then blot or wipe with a cloth to the desired tone. GRAPES-One bunch, Mint Green; one bunch, Fuchsia, and one bunch, Purple. PEACHES-Rouge with Flesh, then brush on a touch of Magenta for the blush. Blend with the cloth.
LEMONS-Rouge with Yellow. TANGERINE-Orange. BOTTOM APPLE-Rouge center with Yellow. Brush Red around Yellow, then blend with the clodi. TOP APPLE-Rouge center with mixture of Yellow and Green. Use a brush to apply Burgundy, streaking chartreuse area and blot with the cloth. RASPBERRIES & CHERRIES-Maroon.
STRAWBERRIES-Red, dien wipe bottoms till almost white. PEAR AT LEFT-Rouge with Mustard, then use clodi to rouge with Red Brown and dien with Green. PEAR AT RIGHT-Brown, then rouge with Mustard and then with Red Brown. PLUM-Mixture of Purple and a little Black.
PIN EAPPLE-Brown, then rouge with Mustard and then with Green.
BANANA-Rouge with mixture of Yellow and Mustard. Pick up a bit of Green and brush on edges, pulling color slightly into yellow. Blend color with the cloth. Brush Brown on tips and blend into green.
LEAVES-For all leaves including pineapple top, use several shades of green. Or, use Green on one half of the leaves and for the other half, add a bit of Black to darken the color. Apply with a brush, then wipe to your liking.
Pick up some Yellow on the cloth, rubbing on the palette to distribute, then rouge on edges or centers of leaves for added interest.
Step 5 Spray the wreath with 2 light coats of matte sealer.
What You’ll Need;
■ Greenware wreath.
■ Cleaning tools.
■ Various brushes.
■ Glazed lile or other palette.
■ T-shirt material
■ Antiquing solution.
■ Blending medium.
■ White nonfiling opaque stain
■ Nonfiling translucent stains-Brown, Mint Green, Fuchsia, Purple, Flesh, Magenta, Orange, Tangerine, Red, Yellow, Green, Burgundy, Maroon, Mustard, Red Brown, and Black.
■ Matte spray sealer.

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